August 20, 2013
Day two.

Day two.

August 6, 2013

The long, crazy ride that is HARD Summer has officially wrapped.

No time for rest, HARD Day of the Dead lineup announced tonight!

July 30, 2013
Of all the shows I’ve worked on, Sunday night was one of my favorites.

Jay Z & Justin Timberlake @ the Rose Bowl.

Of all the shows I’ve worked on, Sunday night was one of my favorites.

Jay Z & Justin Timberlake @ the Rose Bowl.

April 29, 2013

Don’t think I could ever get tired of this song.

April 23, 2013

Anonymous said: So I was reading the question someone asked about doing sound in college and I'm actually going to do radio production major at a college in LA. Im wanting to do sound and tour with bands as well along with interning, but it raised the question, in your opinion, do you think there are a lot of opportunities to do these things with this major besides radio stations? Thank you.

Let’s preface this with: I have not studied audio or radio production, so my response is based on what limited knowledge I have of what a radio production major studies in college.

Are your classes teaching you solely about radio, or is it more audio based? Is there an audio program in which you can take classes?

It goes back to the last question about radio/college, your major doesn’t necessarily dictate where you go from there. However, if you want to work in sound, and there’s an audio program available, is there a reason you’re choosing radio production over audio? If you’re looking to tour, especially as a sound engineer, audio training will likely never hurt your chances. Unless you’re the kind of person unwilling to learn anything outside of what you learned in the classroom, even from those in audio for twenty, thirty years. Don’t be that person. Local sound guys can get real mean, real fast.

There are a lot of opportunities in LA, period. You just have to be willing to work hard and sacrifice any semblance of a life for awhile to get that base foundation down. Since this is a city of networks, if you have the opportunity, major in the field you want to be in. Especially since you’re at college in LA. Many teachers can help, your fellow students are great people to keep in touch with, and the opportunity for guest speakers in your desired fields which you can network with is key.

One thing, be careful about programs that are set on teaching an industry in the way it is right now. For example, and I’m dating myself here, one film program I was in would only teach undergrads about news broadcast production using film cameras. They wouldn’t even consider discussing the inevitable explosion of digital production, which was on the brink that year, and spent months making sure we knew every facet of a physical piece of film. So now people who finished that program had a wealth of knowledge which was basically useless within a year or two. Had the same experience in a music industry class which taught us about the mainstream record labels, and how it was only a matter of time before indie labels folded. Teacher hadn’t ever actually worked in the music industry.

Just keep in mind: Fundamentals are important to learn. But make sure if your college program isn’t keeping up on the current industry, that you are.

April 22, 2013

Anonymous said: Hi I was the person who sent the two messages of going to college and pretty much getting somewhere and I just wanted to say thank you so much for responding and for taking the time. I guess I'm just nervous about things not working out and figuring out how to make all the connections, but I guess I'll figure that out when I get there. I do know there will be at least a 30 min commute on public transportation and a whole lot of hard work but I know it will be worth it so thank you again! :D

You’re welcome. It’s completely okay to feel nervous, and not quite sure about how you’re going to accomplish what you want. Everyone feels that way, whether they’re 18, 30, 45, or 60+. Use that uneasy feeling to fuel your drive to go after what you want.

If you can swing it - invest in a cheap car. Mostly for safety reasons. Trust me, you get stuck in Downtown LA & Union Station for one night in the middle of a freezing January with no coat and very little cash to your name with no way home, you’ll start to question every decision you’ve ever made. Oh, just me? We’ll carry on, then.

Anyway, best of luck at Northridge and in your chosen educational path. Feel free to send me an email once you’re out here, though I’m sure our paths will cross eventually in this tiny industry.

April 17, 2013
aaronkaiser:

“On The Precipice”Settings: 50mm and 1/4000 at f/2.5 (ISO 100)Featuring: Jennifer G

Check out my talented friend Aaron’s photography, and his smart 30 Days of Creativity challenge.

aaronkaiser:

“On The Precipice”
Settings: 50mm and 1/4000 at f/2.5 (ISO 100)
Featuring: Jennifer G

Check out my talented friend Aaron’s photography, and his smart 30 Days of Creativity challenge.

April 17, 2013
If I understand your ask correctly, you want to double major in 1) Film, with a concentration in Radio Production, and 2) Theatre, with a concentration in Sound?
I’ve got a question for you… why the heck do you want to sell merchandise for artists?
If you are just looking for a way on tour, and figure that’s the easiest path, I understand. We’ve all been there. There’s a small percentage chance it could work. But if you double major in what you say you want to, you’ll potentially have so many crazy awesome opportunities available to you once you get your name out there and a couple years of experience under your belt, selling merchandise will seem like a distant, youthful desire.
Now I’m not shaming merchandise. But if you want to work in the sound department, why would you focus on becoming known as a merchandise seller?
One thing I wish everyone would understand: Your major in college does not dictate where you go from there. It really doesn’t. There are millions of people working in fields they did not study in college. There are millions of people who returned to school to study in a different field, in which they did end up working. There are people who never attended college and have their choice professions.
You don’t need your college to give you permission to take a music class. There are workshops, seminars, classes at community colleges, and so on, that will allow you to learn the information you may not have access to at your college. Going to school in Northridge, you’re close enough to Los Angeles that there’s no excuse for not taking advantage of every educational opportunity available in the city. There’ll be a lot of driving. There’ll be many sleepless nights. You’ll get tired. But it will all be worth it. And if it’s not, you’re aiming for the wrong goal.
You reach your end goal by not giving up. Ever. You want to intern at a record label? Apply to every single one, knock on every single door, until someone says yes. You want to do sound at a venue? Ask every single venue manager and theatre manager if you can intern and prove yourself, in exchange for future consideration when they’re looking for a sound person. Intern at a radio station. Radio Disney, KROQ, and other local LA stations are always looking. And most often you can receive college credit. Intern with non-profit organizations throwing benefit concerts. Ask to shadow their sound engineer. Always keep working, learning. Always be that person ready to go, reliable, and with a good attitude. People that can help you recognize a good work ethic when they see one, and they remember the people who are always there, ready to work, and pleasant to be around.
You are young and you have all the time and energy in the world. Don’t waste this opportunity.

If I understand your ask correctly, you want to double major in 1) Film, with a concentration in Radio Production, and 2) Theatre, with a concentration in Sound?

I’ve got a question for you… why the heck do you want to sell merchandise for artists?

If you are just looking for a way on tour, and figure that’s the easiest path, I understand. We’ve all been there. There’s a small percentage chance it could work. But if you double major in what you say you want to, you’ll potentially have so many crazy awesome opportunities available to you once you get your name out there and a couple years of experience under your belt, selling merchandise will seem like a distant, youthful desire.

Now I’m not shaming merchandise. But if you want to work in the sound department, why would you focus on becoming known as a merchandise seller?

One thing I wish everyone would understand: Your major in college does not dictate where you go from there. It really doesn’t. There are millions of people working in fields they did not study in college. There are millions of people who returned to school to study in a different field, in which they did end up working. There are people who never attended college and have their choice professions.

You don’t need your college to give you permission to take a music class. There are workshops, seminars, classes at community colleges, and so on, that will allow you to learn the information you may not have access to at your college. Going to school in Northridge, you’re close enough to Los Angeles that there’s no excuse for not taking advantage of every educational opportunity available in the city. There’ll be a lot of driving. There’ll be many sleepless nights. You’ll get tired. But it will all be worth it. And if it’s not, you’re aiming for the wrong goal.

You reach your end goal by not giving up. Ever. You want to intern at a record label? Apply to every single one, knock on every single door, until someone says yes. You want to do sound at a venue? Ask every single venue manager and theatre manager if you can intern and prove yourself, in exchange for future consideration when they’re looking for a sound person. Intern at a radio station. Radio Disney, KROQ, and other local LA stations are always looking. And most often you can receive college credit. Intern with non-profit organizations throwing benefit concerts. Ask to shadow their sound engineer. Always keep working, learning. Always be that person ready to go, reliable, and with a good attitude. People that can help you recognize a good work ethic when they see one, and they remember the people who are always there, ready to work, and pleasant to be around.

You are young and you have all the time and energy in the world. Don’t waste this opportunity.

April 12, 2013
The distinctive smell of a music venue is so disgustingly familiar, it’s really quite wonderful.

I may have had too much caffeine today.

The distinctive smell of a music venue is so disgustingly familiar, it’s really quite wonderful.

I may have had too much caffeine today.

March 25, 2013

Taking a quick break from writing pilot to say: You bet your ass I pre-ordered Save Rock and Roll.

Now back to my little world with characters who won’t quit making stupid decisions, and saying things you can’t take back - though you wouldn’t if you could.

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